Another Winner!

2ndWinner

Thanks to everyone who participated in the second way you could win a FREE wide quilt back – by purchasing a back during March either online or in the Studio. I drew a name out yesterday from all the entries, and the winner is……someone who purchased this lovely batik backing. Like how I keep you in suspense??? Those of you who bought this piece are wondering, is it me? IS IT ME?????? Well, to find out, just scroll down below the photo……

XTONGA-B9596-BELUGA

Kathy G. of SD! Kathy will be getting a check for the full purchase price of $56.70! Congratulations, Kathy! (And I only had one Kathy G. from SD participate, a local customer, so yes, it is YOU!)

Why to Tear Wide Backs Instead of Cutting

When fabric is rolled on a bolt, it often goes on crooked. You may have noticed this if you cut strips from your fabric and they form a “V” instead of being nice and straight. Due to the extra width, and being folded an extra time, wide backs are more susceptible to this.

Here is a wide back I received recently. When it’s unrolled it from the bolt, it seems fine, doesn’t it?

But look what happens when I align it so the selvages are even:

That’s almost a 4 inch difference!! By the time the backing was squared up, there might not be enough left for your longarm quilter to load it on the frame.

Tearing allows for straight edges on both sides of the yardage, and those edges will be at a 90 degree angle to the selvages. A square back means I can quilt your top without pleats or puckers on the back – something that will make both of us happy!

Visit my website to shop for a wide backing that will be torn so you’re sure you’re getting the right amount!


Tuesday Tip – Making Bias Binding

Becky asked how to make bias binding. This will be more of a tutorial than a tip, so I’ll break it up into several posts over the next few days.

The first step is to determine how much binding to make, and what size square of fabric you will need to start with.

To determine the perimeter of your quilt, add the length plus width in inches and multiply by 2. Then add about 12 inches.

formula:     (L + W) x 2 = perimeter

example:    (90 + 108) x 2 = 396 inches + 12 = 408 inches

This means you will need to make 408 inches of binding to go all the way around your quilt and have enough to join the ends. Now multiply that number by the WIDTH of your binding strips – most people cut a double fold binding at 2-1/2″ wide.

408 x 2.5 = 1020

Finally, take the square root of that result to know the size of the fabric square you will need to start with. (I don’t know how to type a square root symbol, so just pretend that I did, okay???)

Square root of 1015 = 31.94

I prefer to have a little extra than not enough, so I would start with a piece of fabric about 33 – 34 inches square.

Whew!! Is your head spinning yet from all the math??? Do we need something to clear our heads?? How about a look at some lovely new wide backing fabrics??

See the pretty colors?

Can’t you feel how soft they are?

There now, don’t you feel better? There’s nothing like a fabric fix to make everything okay……

Stay tuned – next installment will be how to easily cut the strips on the bias.

Did you know that you can subscribe to my blog so you don’t miss anything? Go ahead, you know you want to……….

<——–You’ll find a place to sign up right over there in the left hand column (you may need to scroll up a bit)

%d bloggers like this: